Padan to Pau
Dictionary of Bible Names

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Padan
Read our dedicated article on this topic.

Padanaram
Read our dedicated article on this topic.

Palestine (Palestina)
Rolling, migratory, land of sojourners
Strong's #H6429

The King James Bible uses the word Palestine in Joel 3:4. The term originally denoted only the seacoast of Canaan that was inhabited by the Philistines (Philistia).

Palestine (Palestina) began to be used in reference to a wider area than just Philistine territory around 135 A.D. Its use came into existence due to the Bar Kokhba Revolt.

The revolt, which took place in Judea from 132 to 136 A.D., was led by Simon ben Kosevah. It was an attempt to free the Jews from Roman domination and to reestablish their control over Jerusalem. The rebellion, however, was brutally crushed by Emperor Hadrian.

Hadrian combined the Roman provinces of Syria and Judea into a new provincial territory called Syria Palestina. He named the new province "in honor" of Israel's longtime enemy the Philistines.

References
Exodus 15:14, Isaiah 14:29, 31, Joel 3:4

Additional Studies

Pamphylia
See our listing for Lycia.

Paphos
Read our dedicated article on this topic.

Paran
Place of caverns, ornamental
Strong's #H6290

Paran was the name of a wilderness area stretching from the heart of Arabia to southwest of the Dead Sea. It is where Ishmael, Abraham's son through Hagar, sought refuge.

The children of Israel spent time wandering Paran after leaving Egyptian slavery. Mount Paran is also located in this wilderness area (Deuteronomy 33:2).

References
Genesis 21:21, Numbers 10:12, 12:16, 13:3, 26, Deuteronomy 1:1, 33:2, 1Samuel 25:1, 1Kings 11:18, Habakkuk 3:3

Parmenas
Constant, abiding
Strong's #G3937

Parmenas was one of the first seven men, selected by the early church, to handle the daily distribution of food to the poor saints in Jerusalem. These men are commonly referred to as the New Testament's first deacons.

References
Acts 6:5

Parthians
A pledge
Strong's #H3934

Parthia became a world power in 247 B.C. The Empire reached its height of power under Mithridates II (123 - 88 B.C.) when it controlled 1.1 million square miles (2.84 million square kilometers) of territory.

Parthians were some of the many people, in 30 A.D., present in Jerusalem at Pentecost when God poured out his Holy Spirit upon the repentant.

References
Acts 2:9

Additional Studies

Pasdammim
Boundary of blood, palm of bloodshed
Strong's #H6450

Pasdammim was where one of David's victories over the Philistines took place.

References
1Chronicles 11:13

Patara
Scattering, cursing
Strong's #G3959

Patara was a Mediterranean seaport town located in the Asia Minor Roman province of Lycia - Pamphylia. The Apostle Paul, returning to Jerusalem during his third missionary journey, briefly stopped in Patara in order to board another boat.

References
Acts 21:1

Additional Studies

Pathros
Region of the south
Strong's #H6624

Pathros is one of the many locations from which God will collect his people and bring them back to Israel.

References
Isaiah 11:11, Jeremiah 44:1, 15, Ezekiel 29:14, 30:14

Patmos
Read our dedicated article on this topic.


Patrobas
Father's life, paternal
Strong's #G3969

Patrobas was one of the many Christians in Rome greeted by the Apostle Paul in the book of Romans. He was likely a member of a house church attended by Asyncritus, Phlegon, Hermas, Hermes and others.

References
Romans 16:14

Pau
Bleating, screaming
Strong's #H6464

Pau was the capital of Edom when King Hadar ruled the people.

References
Genesis 36:39

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Series Notes
Scripture references are based
on the King James translation.



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